Australia’s Tide Turning

by | Oct 25, 2023 | Journalism Scholarship, News | 0 comments

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by Kobe Jacobs, ACS Literary Scholar

The ODI World Cup is one long tournament. And although the Australians didn’t have the best start to this current campaign in India, they have displayed a tremendous amount of fightback in their last two fixtures. Beating Sri Lanka and Pakistan, two nations renowned for their passion for the game of cricket was no easy task. Even though these past two matches have been comprehensive and commanding wins for the boys in green and gold, it certainly didn’t look that way early on in the Sri Lanka game.

When the Lions were 125 without loss after the 21st over, the Australians seemed to be in dire straits. However, it’s silly to doubt our boys, given the amount of depth we have throughout the eleven players who step onto the field within this format. Whether it be with bat or ball, our squad seems to not just rely on one or two individuals. You only have to look at the previous games to recognise that this Australian team is not a one-trick pony, instead, they are multi-faceted and are a well-oiled machine when playing together as one.

The Sri Lanka game saw the brilliance of David Warner’s amazing fielding out in deep, which was complimented with sparks of clinical bowling from Adam Zampa. It must be said that the leg spinner was having a tough time of it against both India and South Africa but finishing with figures of 4-47 off 8 overs demonstrated one thing from both him and his teammates, steely determination.

This sense of not giving up has turned Australia’s fortunes around. After the slow start to this tournament, they have now transitioned into a relentless one-day side. The belligerent partnership of David Warner and Mitchell Marsh against Pakistan was a sight to behold. After he was dropped in the fifth over, Warner bashed the ball in an innings to cherish, but also provided a platform for his side to go on and have a comprehensive victory. Because of the powerful left hander, both he and his country look in the right order to reach the latter stages of this tournament. With India looking like the team to beat in this World Cup, if the Australians keep up this hot streak of form, with players chipping in with standout performances during critical moments in games, maybe our beloved side might just add another ODI World Cup trophy to their already stacked trophy cabinet.

Australian Cricket Society’s literary scholar Kobe Jacobs is mentored by writer John Harms. His pieces are also published at www.footyalmanac.com.au .